Thoughts: NTSO’s ‘Resurrection’

or Thoughts in preparation for attending my first live performance of one of the greatest symphonies ever written My goodness. How long I’ve been waiting for this concert. And I know it’s not Vienna or New York or Chicago or anything, but it’s still Mahler, and it’s still one of the most respected (or at least oldest) ensembles in the country. And I don’t have to travel down to 台中 to hear them. In any case, this was the Mahler work that made me fall in love with Mahler, and I’m not entirely sure why. (Also, if you’re unfamiliar with this … Continue reading Thoughts: NTSO’s ‘Resurrection’

Concert Review: 4.27 男高音湯發凱獨唱會

Tenor vocal recital In case you didn’t know, Austrians are intense people… In my write-ups on concerts, I do my best to address the concert and not the pieces themselves, but that’s hard to do in some ways, especially when you’re not super familiar with said pieces. In any case, last year, I went to see Schoenberg’s Gurrelieder performed by our very fine National Symphony Orchestra. As you dedicated readers will know, it demands some serious forces, and one of those is a tenor. The tenor’s performance (both musically and… acting-ly? dramatically?) was excellent, and I actually ended up making … Continue reading Concert Review: 4.27 男高音湯發凱獨唱會

Concert Review: Mahler 3

as performed by the Taipei Symphony Orchestra under Maestro Eliahu Inbal on April 6, 2015. Again… There are some concerts that you’re so excited about you lose sleep over, concerts that make you feel like your ticket in is the golden ticket for Willy Wonka’s Whatever it Was (if you’re into that sort of thing), and when you file into the concert hall (of hopefully well-behaved, polite, respectful patrons), you feel a cozy sense of togetherness, of privilege, of camaraderie in the knowledge that you are preparing to experience something that only these few thousand (ish?) people on earth in … Continue reading Concert Review: Mahler 3

The composer and conductor: which comes first?

This is not a piece I’m going to spend lots of time analyzing the history of in preparation for a dissertation on the subject. It was just a passing thought I had based on this week’s music piece for Thursday, and I thought I’d talk about it. It’ll make more sense when you know what that piece is, but for now, it’s at least worth talking about in the context of Mahler.While he seemed to have garnered some praise and recognition in his time for his works, most prominently the eighth symphony, he was known during his lifetime far more … Continue reading The composer and conductor: which comes first?